February122014
socimages:

"Vinegar" Valentine’s: The lost tradition.
For 100 years Valentine’s Day was not only associated with sweet sentiments, but was an occasion to send a cruel and biting message to someone you didn’t like.  These cards — called “vinegar valentines” — were popular from 1840 to 1940 in both America and the U.K.
Annebella Pollen, an art and design historian, explains that there was a valentine for many types of people and occasions:

"You could send them to your neighbors, friends, or enemies. You could send them to your schoolteacher, your boss, or people whose advances you wanted to dismiss. You could send them to people you thought were too ugly or fat, who drank too much, or people acting above their station. There was a card for pretty much every social ailment."

Pollen insists that people did send them to one another, albeit anonymously, and they were not meant to be jokes. Instead, they were meant to say: “Your behavior is unacceptable.”  For much of the 1800s there was no such thing as a pre-paid stamp, so the person who got the mail paid for it, so often they were forced to buy their own insults, a twist of the knife from the sender.
See more vinegar Valentine’s Day cards at Sociological Images.

socimages:

"Vinegar" Valentine’s: The lost tradition.

For 100 years Valentine’s Day was not only associated with sweet sentiments, but was an occasion to send a cruel and biting message to someone you didn’t like.  These cards — called “vinegar valentines” — were popular from 1840 to 1940 in both America and the U.K.

Annebella Pollen, an art and design historian, explains that there was a valentine for many types of people and occasions:

"You could send them to your neighbors, friends, or enemies. You could send them to your schoolteacher, your boss, or people whose advances you wanted to dismiss. You could send them to people you thought were too ugly or fat, who drank too much, or people acting above their station. There was a card for pretty much every social ailment."

Pollen insists that people did send them to one another, albeit anonymously, and they were not meant to be jokes. Instead, they were meant to say: “Your behavior is unacceptable.”  For much of the 1800s there was no such thing as a pre-paid stamp, so the person who got the mail paid for it, so often they were forced to buy their own insults, a twist of the knife from the sender.

See more vinegar Valentine’s Day cards at Sociological Images.

February92014
gardensgrey:


“I noticed that he kept looking over at me. He had been doing that a lot. So I stood up from the desk, walked over to him and said, “If you’re going to keep looking at me, and I’m going to keep looking back, we might as well be introduced. I’m Hillary Rodham.” That was it. The way Bill tells the story, he couldn’t remember his own name.” -Hillary Rodham Clinton

gardensgrey:

I noticed that he kept looking over at me. He had been doing that a lot. So I stood up from the desk, walked over to him and said, “If you’re going to keep looking at me, and I’m going to keep looking back, we might as well be introduced. I’m Hillary Rodham.” That was it. The way Bill tells the story, he couldn’t remember his own name. -Hillary Rodham Clinton

(via retrocampaigns)

February82014
weirdvintage:

This Vintage Valentine depicts a naked baby-cherub setting your heart-house on fire.  Of course,  (via)

weirdvintage:

This Vintage Valentine depicts a naked baby-cherub setting your heart-house on fire.  Of course,  (via)

(via weirdvintage)

February72014

specialbored:

Valentine’s Day is quickly approaching and there’s only one possible way to show love. That’s right, cards. Everybody knows that love can’t exist without cards. Luckily the fiancee and I have made a bunch for you so the thinking part is over.  We can ship them to you lickety split. If you’re a fan of my special boards, check em out here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/eyesoredesign Thanks so much!

Yep.

February52014
February42014
February22014

brightwalldarkroom:

"I love Kools"

A moment of levity: a simple, funny outtake from Paul Thomas Anderson’s 2012 film, The Master, in which Hoffman and Phoenix struggle to keep from laughing. Allow this in and let it be the much-needed, lighter moment on an awful day like today, the antidote to all the crap you don’t want to know about Hoffman’s death (and, really, we shouldn’t know the details, they are literally none of our business).

Instead, watch this guy work, and see all the light in him.

12PM
8AM
February12014
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